What to expect when using our service

There are a variety of ways in which we work.  Please click on the links below to find out more:

Baby years

Your baby’s daily activities include playing, sleeping, eating, having a bath, nappy changes, being dressed, interacting with others and their surrounding environment. All babies are different and some manage these activities more easily than others for lots of different reasons.

Occupational therapists that specialise in working with babies can assess why your baby is having difficulties with their daily activities. They may provide support, advice or therapy intervention to develop your baby’s skills. Examples of babies they work with are premature babies, babies that have had difficulties around the time of birth and babies with a known medical condition.

If you are worried about your baby’s progress, speak to your health visitor.

Early years

Your child is now in school and is adapting to a more structured environment.  They are expected to sit for longer and complete more adult led tasks, requiring them to maintain concentration for increasing lengths of time. They are developing their independence skills such as dressing, using cutlery and self-care and as they progress through school they are expected to take more responsibility for these tasks.  Through their primary school years your child is developing the necessary skills to complete tasks such as handwriting, using scissors and other utensils.  They are exploring their own interests and may wish to learn specific skills such as bike riding.  Towards the end of their primary school years children are encouraged to take on more responsibility in organising themselves in preparation for the transition into Secondary School.

If your child is finding any of these tasks challenging please click here for advice and support

Primary school

Your child is now in school and is adapting to a more structured environment.  They are expected to sit for longer and complete more adult led tasks, requiring them to maintain concentration for increasing lengths of time. They are developing their independence skills such as dressing, using cutlery and self-care and as they progress through school they are expected to take more responsibility for these tasks.  Through their primary school years your child is developing the necessary skills to complete tasks such as handwriting, using scissors and other utensils.  They are exploring their own interests and may wish to learn specific skills such as bike riding.  Towards the end of their primary school years children are encouraged to take on more responsibility in organising themselves in preparation for the transition into Secondary School.

If your child is finding any of these tasks challenging, please click here for advice and support

Secondary school

Your child is now in secondary school and needs to develop independent learning skills in this formal environment.  They are expected to find their way around a large building, following a timetable which may vary from week to week with less and less adult support.  Skills such as tying a tie, doing up shoelaces and confident use of knife and fork in the dining hall are important at this stage, as well as keeping up with increased volumes of handwriting at greater speed. 

If your child is finding any of these tasks challenging please click here for advice and support.